Book Review: Last Bus to Everland by Sophie Cameron

 
 
Brody is unhappy---feeling inferior to his brother, feeling invisible to his parents, being bothered by bullies, worrying about his future---so when a cute, confident boy chases off his bullies and invites him to hang out the next night, he goes. What he finds is an alternate dimension called Everland where he feels accepted and happy, but when the doors to Everland start disappearing, Brody and his Everland friends will have to decide if real life is worth the struggles.

Book Review: Last Bus to Everland by Sophie Cameron
Title: Last Bus to Everland
Author:
Publisher:
Pages: 325
My Rating:
More Info: Goodreads, Amazon, Publisher
 

Review:

*I won a copy of this book in a Goodreads giveaway. This has not influenced my review.*

I loved how this book felt so realistic and genuine in terms of the characters’ struggles and imperfections. They were a bunch of teens dealing with real teen problems—fitting in, figuring themselves out, being bullied, feeling upstaged by siblings, not being understood by parents, needing breaks from all the pressure, struggling with mental illness, having financial problems, having difficulties with school, not knowing what to do with their futures, etc.

They were also a bunch of teens who were good people—maybe not perfect, but not judgmental or mean either. The main character was a relatable one, especially for LGBT+ teens. But honestly, I think a lot of people could find something to relate to in this book. Wouldn’t everyone who’s ever felt misunderstood or judged or like an outsider love to find a place like Everland where you can just be yourself and have time and space to work through your thoughts and feelings away from the struggles of real life? This book was all about figuring out who you are, learning to accept yourself even if some people never will, coping with life’s difficulties, and realizing that even people whose lives look perfect have their own struggles you don’t even know about.

This was also just an easy book to sink into. There was tension and a bit of an ominous feel as the story went on, and I wanted to know what was going to happen, both in Brody’s personal life and with Everland.

This book was more contemporary YA than fantasy, which is not something I normally read, but it had relatable and diverse characters, a story that kept me reading, some great messages, and some touching, bittersweet moments that made me tear up a bit. I enjoyed this, and I think it would be especially great for teens.

 
 
Book Blurb

From Sophie Cameron, the author of Out of the Blue, comes a novel of magic, adventure, and what it means to truly belong.

Brody Fair feels like nobody gets him: not his overworked parents, not his genius older brother, and definitely not the girls in the projects set on making his life miserable. Then he meets Nico, an art student who takes Brody to Everland, a “knock-off Narnia” that opens its door at 11:21pm each Thursday for Nico and his band of present-day misfits and miscreants.

Here Brody finds his tribe and a weekly respite from a world where he feels out of place. But when the doors to Everland begin to disappear, Brody is forced to make a decision: He can say goodbye to Everland and to Nico, or stay there and risk never seeing his family again. Will Nico take the last bus to Everland?

Basic Info

Book Author:
Publisher:
Genre: , ,
My Rating:
Series/Standalone:

More Info (Possible Spoilers)

LGBT+ Rep:
Relationships/Sex: ,

 
 
 

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  1. Roberta R.

    This one reminds me of Every Heart a Doorway (the 1st installment in the Wayward Children series) – a portal fantasy novella brimming with diverse characters, but not that big on fantasy…though far more than LBTE, it sounds. I liked the latter installments much better, while I rated EHAD 3.5 stars…same as you here. And I feel like I would end up rating this one the same way. Maybe it’s one of those YA books that will indeed speak to actual teens more than it did/would for us (you, more or less, ended your review with the same thought).

  2. Olivia Roach

    Ahh, as a contemporary reader, yes I do like when books are about realistic problems. I love that this one was such a relatable kind of read and that the characters were ones we can really connect to. And teens must be able to do so especially, even more than us. Lovely review, Kristen! I missed reading your blog <3

  3. Becky @ A Fool's Ingenuity

    When I was reading the summary I did think it wasn’t quite your usual read, I think it was the fact it’s YA, so I’m glad you enjoyed this. It certainly sounds like you’re right and plenty of people will find something to relate to in this. I’d never even heard of it, how is it you’re always finding this new and interesting books?