Book Review: Tone Deaf by Olivia Rivers

 
 
Ali, a former child prodigy at piano, has been deaf, using ASL and lip reading to get by, for seven years. But when her best friend drags her to a concert for a band whose music Ali has never even heard, she ends up winning the raffle to go backstage and meet the leader singer, Jace. Their first meeting doesn't go well, but, when he asks her to come back the next day and then notices her bruises, he knows she's being abused and offers her a chance to escape by joining the band on tour until she turns 18 in a few months. Ali accepts and rediscovers her love for music as she attempts to start her new life.
 

 
Book Review: Tone Deaf by Olivia Rivers | books, reading, book covers, book reviews, romance, contemporary romance, young adult, deafness
Title: Tone Deaf
Author:
Publisher:
Pages: 288
My Book Rating:
More Info: Goodreads, Amazon
 

Review:

*I received a free ecopy of this book via Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review.*

I’m not really sure how to rate or review this book because it was so very not the type of book I normally read. (Something to keep in mind while reading my review.) I rarely step outside the SFF genre nowadays, I really don’t read YA contemporary, and I even more really don’t read rockstar romance.

But I wanted to read this because it’s one of the few books I’ve found that has a deaf protagonist.

And, despite it being out of my norm, I enjoyed it and thought it was pretty good for the genre that it is.

The deafness seemed to be handled well (aside from the fact that it’s probably a lot harder to lip read in real life), and I loved getting to see things through Ali’s perspective because it allowed me to realize some of the things I take for granted as a hearing person. (And the author includes resources in the back for anyone who wants to learn more.)

The topic of abusive parents also seemed to be handled well and realistically enough. It was mostly kept to the backstory, so it shouldn’t be too much of a problem for anyone who feels uncomfortable reading about abuse happening on screen, but, because it was still the focus (characters trying to escape and overcome their past abuse), the book did end up being pretty heavy. I thought that was a good thing because abuse is a heavy topic, but I wanted to include a warning for anyone who doesn’t like that.

As for the characters, Jace seemed a little unrealistic with his extreme behaviors and emotions, but Ali was a great character, and I liked that she had such eclectic interests instead of just being a stereotype. I also felt for her and the situation she was in.

So overall, the premise and the romance weren’t the most realistic, but it was a fairly quick read that handled heavy topics well without being graphic or going overboard.

 
 
Book Blurb

His world is music. Her world is silent.

Ali Collins was a child prodigy destined to become one of the greatest musicians of the twenty-first century—until she was diagnosed with a life-changing brain tumor. Now, at seventeen, Ali lives in a soundless world where she gets by with American Sign Language and lip-reading. She’s a constant disappointment to her father, a retired cop fighting his own demons, and the bruises are getting harder to hide.

When Ali accidentally wins a backstage tour with the chart-topping band Tone Deaf, she’s swept back into the world of music. Jace Beckett, the nineteen-year-old lead singer of the band, has a reputation. He’s a jerk and a player, and Ali wants nothing to do with him. But there’s more to Jace than the tabloids let on. When Jace notices Ali’s bruises and offers to help her escape to New York, Ali can’t turn down the chance at freedom and a fresh start. Soon she’s traveling cross-country, hidden away in Jace’s RV as the band finishes their nationwide tour. With the help of Jace, Ali sets out to reboot her life and rediscover the music she once loved.

Basic Info

Book Author:
Publisher:
Genre: , ,
My Book Rating:
Series/Standalone:
Setting Location:

More Info (Possible Spoilers)

Disability: ,
Romance Type:
Other:

Warnings

Sex:
Violence:
Strong Language:

 
 

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18 thoughts on “Book Review: Tone Deaf by Olivia Rivers

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    1. Kristen Burns

      Yay! I’m glad my review was able to help someone who is a contemporary fan :-) There just aren’t a lot of deaf characters period though. I’ve seen two other books with deaf protags, and those were both YA, so I think YA is doing better than adult lol.

  1. Angela @ Simply Angela

    This one does sound a bit different and I’m always looking for something different. I like that the protagonist is deaf–I’ve read a historical romance where the heroine was blind, but I’ve not read one where the heroine was deaf. My only struggle with this one, I think, would be where it’s a YA romance. I don’t read too many YA or NA books.

    Angela @ Simply Angela recently posted: The World of Debbie Macomber: Come Home to Color

    1. Kristen Burns

      I’ve never read a book with a blind character, so we’re opposite on that. I do read YA as well as adult, though YA does sometimes get on my nerves, so I can understand why the YA part would bother you.

    1. Kristen Burns

      I like listening to music (obviously you know this lol), but I don’t really care to read about it. But it was the deaf character part that I liked. Do you happened to remember what book it was that you read? I only know of a couple others.

          1. Kristen Burns

            No worries, I deleted the extra :-) And awesome, I’m going to look that book up! The two that I know of are There Will Be Lies by Nick Lake and Talk Under Water by Kathryn Lomer, but I haven’t had the chance to read either one yet.

  2. Greg

    I don’t know if I’ve read anything with a deaf protagonist, I don’t think so. The premise is interesting- a deaf girl rediscovering music. I can see where he might be a little unrealistic, but Ali sounds like a good character. Her perspective does sound like it would be the best part. And it has a nice cover. :)

    Greg recently posted: Game of Thrones Oathbreaker

    1. Kristen Burns

      Yeah, they’re hard to find in books. Her perspective was the best part. Not that Jace was necessarily an unlikeable character, but his back and forth emotions were just too much for me. It is a nice cover :-)

  3. Ashley G.

    Hm, this sounds really interesting. I’m not really into contemporary either, especially romantic contemporary. But when someone mentions music or musicians in a book, I always know I have to at least give it a try. Meaning that I’ve also put down some really cheesy music stories. . . But I keep trying to find a good one. XD So I might have to give this a try, plus a deaf protagonist always intrigues me. Awesome review!

    1. Kristen Burns

      You’ll have to let me know what you think if you try it! I get you though, contemporary romance in general seems to be too cheesy for me which is why I usually don’t read it. But this one does have music and deafness :-) Thanks!

  4. Lola

    While I like contemporary romances, I very rarely read YA contemporary romances, even though it was a YA contemporary romance that got me back into the genre. I can’t remember many rockstar romances I read, I don’t really think they are my thing usually.
    I do like the sound of this book though. It’s original to find a book with a deaf protagonist. I am glad to hear the deaf aspect was handled well. And it nice when you find a book that deals with some heavy topics without the book feeling too heavy. Greta review!

    btw did you change your blog design? It feels like it looks a bit differently, but can’t put my finger on what exactly changed.

    Lola recently posted: Review: May by Audrey Carlan

    1. Kristen Burns

      Yeah, you really don’t find many deaf protagonists. It’d great there were more of this kind of diversity in SFF. But this was still good at least and focused more on the emotional effects than the actual abuse, which was nice.

      Wow, you must be really perceptive! I made the blog 200px wider, so everything is just a little bit bigger.