Book Review: Shatterproof by Xen Sanders

 
 
Grey is tired of struggling with depression and doesn't want to live anymore. Saint doesn't know anything about himself or his life other than the fact that he's not human and accidentally kills everyone he loves when he feeds from their life in order to fuel his own, but he hates himself for it. When Saint and Grey cross paths, it seems like a perfect exchange---Grey gets the death he wants and Saint gets a victim who's willing---until they fall in love and Saint becomes desperate to save the life of a man who may not want to be saved.
 

 
Book Review: Shatterproof by Xen Sanders | reading, books, book reviews, fantasy, paranormal romance, urban fantasy, lgbt, m/m, fae, depression
Title: Shatterproof
Author:
Publisher:
Pages: 232
My Book Rating: 4 Stars
More Info: Goodreads, Amazon, Publisher
 
Review:

*I received a free ecopy of this book via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.*

This was a very character-focused book, all about Grey and Saint and their inner struggles and relationship with each other. It was slow-paced, but that’s not a complaint at all because it never dragged, and the pace worked well with the character-focused aspect and feel of the book.

I also liked that this book included the topic of mental health and seemed to handle it well. Grey was struggling with depression and suicidal thoughts (plus one actual attempt at the very beginning), and the book really delved into his mind in order to explain what depression feels like, or at least what it felt like to him. And Saint, while not quite depressed, had his own struggles too, trying to cope with not knowing who he was, with not being human, with grief for all the men he loved, and with the insecurity of feeling like no one could love the monster that he saw himself as.

*SPOILER ALERT (I’m going to discuss the mood/feel of the book and whether it has a happy ending or not)* That being said, this book wasn’t the dark, heart-wrenching thing I thought it would be and didn’t make me particularly emotional. I’m not saying it had no emotion—there were scenes that made me smile and frown and feel for the characters—but it was more hopeful and sweet than dark, with a supportive, near-perfect type of romance (that does not cure Grey’s depression but does help him see light in the darkness) and “beautifully flawed” characters. So while it could be triggering for anyone with depression or suicidal thoughts, the overall story was not a depressing one. This is neither good nor bad, it just depends on what type of characters, story, and outlook on mental illness you’re looking for. However, I do tend to have a high tolerance for emotion/flaws/darkness/pain in books, so keep that in mind. *END SPOILER ALERT*

Last but not least, I want to mention that I loved the beautiful, lyrical style of writing. It was still plenty easy to understand, but the descriptions of the characters, the emotions, the passion, the intimacy, etc. were wonderful.

So overall, this was a very character-focused paranormal book that really delved into the topic of mental illness, and the beautiful writing made it a pleasure to read!

 
 
Book Blurb

Saint’s afraid to die. Grey can’t stand to live.

Grey Jean-Marcelin wants to die. He thought painting his passion—vivid portrayals of Haitian life and vodou faith—would be enough to anchor him to this world. But it isn’t. And when the mysterious man known only as Saint saves Grey from a suicide attempt, it’s more curse than blessing—until Grey discovers that Saint isn’t just an EMT. He’s a banished fae, and can only survive by draining the lives of those he loves.

All Saint needed was a simple bargain: one life willingly given for another. But as Saint’s feelings for Grey grow deeper, centuries of guilt leave him desperate to save a man who doesn’t want salvation, even if Grey’s life means Saint’s death.

When Grey’s depression consumes him, only he can decide if living is worth the struggle. Yet his choice may come too late to save his life . . . or Saint’s soul. And whatever choice he makes, it may shatter them both.

Basic Info

Book Author:
Publisher:
Genre: , , ,
My Book Rating:
Series/Standalone:
Setting Location: ,

More Info (Possible Spoilers)

Sexual Orientation: ,
Disability: ,
Non-Human Type:
Romance Type:
Other: ,
Extra Love: ,

Warnings

Sex:
Violence:
Strong Language:

 
 

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14 thoughts on “Book Review: Shatterproof by Xen Sanders

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  1. Greg

    I haven’t read a lot of stories that deal with depression, and mixing that up with a fae story is kinda cool. Especially a fae who doesn’t want to be quite so destructive lol. I usually like the fae to be pretty nasty but in this case the fact that he’s lamenting what he has to do to survive sounds like a different take. And it seems to look at depression with a bit of hope while not sugar coating it. Which is nice.

    Greg recently posted: Bookcover Spotlight #63

    1. Kristen Burns

      I’ve read a couple this year that dealt with depression, but in one of them he was just instantly cured and a whole new person at the end, which is… no. So yeah, it was nice that this one didn’t happen like that. You do have a thing for the nasty fae lol, but the tortured hero who sees himself as a monster and hates it is actually pretty typical of paranormal romance love interests. Though in Saint’s case, he wasn’t killing strangers, he was literally killing the people he fell in love with, so that aspect was different. I think anyone would lament that, haha.

  2. Lola

    I think a slow pace can work really well with a character focused book as there’s enough going on with the characters that it’s not a bad thing the story doesn’t move as quickly. But with the focus on depression and suicidal thoughts I don ‘t think this would be a book i enjoy. I am glad you enjoyed this one and the character focused part with some paranormal thrown in does sound like a nice combination.

    Lola recently posted: Sunday Post #193

    1. Kristen Burns

      Slow-paced does work well with character-focused books, which is why I like a slow pace when it’s done well. Yeah, I know you don’t like reading about things like depression, but thanks :-) It wasn’t quite what I expected, but I enjoyed it.

    1. Kristen Burns

      Thank you! I’m also a m/m fiction fan, and I love paranormal, but to find books with those two things plus any sort of illness is a rare combination! And thanks in advance for linking to my review, I’ll have to go check out the post :-)

    1. Kristen Burns

      Thanks, I’m glad I could help you find a book you’re interested in! But definitely take care of yourself first since it could be triggering, no need to rush into the book. Good luck finding the right meds that work for you, and I’d love to know your thoughts if you do eventually read this!

  3. roro

    I’m adding this on to my tbr. I enjoy slow romances and character driven books. I ‘ve read books with depression before and i want to see how it is handled in Shatterproof. Thanks for the review

    1. Kristen Burns

      Glad I could help you find a book! I’ll be curious to know what you think about how the depression is handled and the book in general if you do read it.